New England Border Collie Rescue - Helping Border Collies in NeedDogs With Jobs™
What is a Border Collie?
Adopting a Border Collie from NEBCR
Giving Up a Border Collie
How to Help New England Border Collie Rescue
NEBCR Store
NEBCR Events
Site Map
Contact Us
Home

Dog of the Week
Molly

Molly
6-7 y.o. female
click here for her story...


YOUR DONATIONS ARE NEEDED TO HELP AS MANY HOMELESS BORDER COLLIES AS POSSIBLE

What is a Border Collie?

The Border Collie developed centuries ago in Britain as a herding dog to help manage the large flocks of sheep that grazed on the vast mountainous pastures of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Dr. Johannes Caius, physician to Queen Elisabeth I, writing in the 1500s, mentions the "shepherd's dogge" in his book, De Canibus Britannicus (Treatise on Englishe Dogges), and describes how they work. His description could be a description of how the Border Collie works today.

The breed is still used today as a herding dog, and still bred for its herding ability or instincts. Bred for hilly conditions, the Border Collie is outstanding when it comes to working sheep. These inborn traits - the instinct to gather, the intelligence to understand what is required, the independence to work at far distances from the shepherd, the ability to cooperate with a shepherd, and the stamina to run the hills all day long when necessary - are what makes the breed sought after for dog sports like obedience, agility, Frisbee and flyball; but they are also what makes the breed difficult as a pet or companion.

What does a Border Collie look like?

Why do people give up their Border Collies?

Do Border Collies really make good pets?

Is a Border Collie for you?

Why not consider a grown dog?


Why do people give up their Border Collies?

In inappropriate situations, intelligent, active dogs may be destructive or bark incessantly, becoming a nuisance. Because of their herding instincts, Border Collies left to run loose may chase cars or children; even biting children in their desire to control movement, becoming a hazard to themselves or others. People sometimes buy a Border Collie without understanding the needs of the breed, and find they cannot cope with those needs. Divorce, health problems, death, relocation, and financial problems can force people to give up or abandon a dog.

photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo

Do Border Collies really make good pets?

Many Border Collies have difficulty adjusting to life as a pet. They need attention and activity. Because sheepdogs are bred to work as a team with a shepherd, they are human oriented. They do not do well in a household where they are left alone for long hours of the day. In this type of situation they often get into trouble trying to keep themselves from getting bored. They chew furniture, tear off wallpaper, dig holes in gardens, chase cars and paper boys, chase and nip children. Tied up for long periods without human contact, or left in a yard where they can see but not participate in human activity, they may bark incessantly or exhibit other unacceptable behaviors. Those that are very sensitive may not take to strangers or correction well, or may be very shy. Border Collies with strong herding instincts may exhibit what some might consider bizarre behavior: circling, staring at objects for long periods of time, trembling when excited, appearing to stalk small animals, other dogs, and small children, and so forth.

On the plus side, Border Collies are intelligent dogs, often great "characters" who will entertain their owners from morning to night. They are very trainable and can be taught to do a great many things. Their sensitive nature can make them loyal and loving. In an active and involved home, Border Collies can make excellent companions, and are the true "interactive" pet - requiring their humans to be a part of their games and indeed their daily life.

Is a Border Collie for you?

Many people are now considering a Border Collie as a potential new pet, thanks to their increasing visibility in the media and the growing popularity of dog sports. However as a general rule, Border Collies are not a good pet for a typical pet owner. Please be sure you know what you are getting into before you buy or adopt a Border Collie. Please read about the breed BEFORE you get one as a pet. If after you read about the breed, you decide that a Border Collie is the right dog for you, please consider rescuing a Border Collie in need of a good home.

Why not adopt a grown dog?

Border Collies are intelligent, versatile, very trainable dogs. You may have noticed them in movies, television and in magazine advertisements. They have been written about in books and articles in the popular press. The Border Collie has become a popular breed but is still not for everyone. More and more Border Collies are in need of rescue each year, and there are more dogs available for placement than there are loving homes to place them in.

If you were thinking of getting a Border Collie, why not consider a grown, rescue dog? Many make loving and loyal companions; some are excellent working dogs; others can be suitable candidates for sports and competition, such as Obedience, Agility, Flyball, or Frisbee- - as long as you understand the breed and can meet their need for attention and exercise. If you are interested, we welcome you to find out more about the adopting a dog from NEBCR.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE BREED, PLEASE VISIT CAROLE PRESBERG'S "BORDER COLLIE MUSEUM"

back to the top...

   
           

New England Border Collie Rescue
copyright 2000-2017 New England Border Collie Rescue, Inc. (NEBCR)
all rights reserved

All photos and copy contained on this website are the property of New England Border Collie Rescue, Inc.
and may not be used or reproduced in any other format without express permission of NEBCR, Inc.

NEBCR, Inc. is an ALL VOLUNTEER, 501(c)(3) nonprofit
corporation and all donations are tax-deductible.

This site is maintained by NEBCR, Inc.
Privacy Policy

What is a Border Collie? - Adopting a Border Collie - Giving Up a Border Collie - How to Help
NEBCR Store - Resources & Fun Stuff - Events - Site Map - Contact Us - Home